Is it RHDV2?

What to do if you suspect the virus

First, if you're on this site reading because you've come across a sick or dead rabbit, we're so sorry for the news.
 

Avoid getting close and DO NOT TOUCH.

Do your part to prevent spreading the virus by your actions, your distance, your diligence. 


Make the phone calls, leave messages if needed.

Preserve the scene until someone can come and investigate.  ( If it's after hours, and its a wild rabbit, consider covering the body with a tarp held in place with weighted objects to prevent scavengers.   If it's your pet rabbit, call your local 24 hour animal hospital ).  

Remember that the virus is not just on the body, so it can be transmitted to anything the rabbit touched.   So you walking in the yard can pick up the virus on your shoes.  Even though humans won't get sick from this virus, you can be spreading the virus, so just be smart about wearing PPE (personal protective equipment), washing hands & clothes, disinfecting shoes and anything you used.

DISINFECTING GUIDELINES (USDA)

Things that might lead you to suspect RHDV2 include:

Always err on the side of caution. 
Make the call and start the process just to be sure.

 

SICK or DEAD         

DOMESTIC RABBIT 
 

Call your State Vet to 

Report Suspected Case 
Phone List

SICK/DEAD WILD RABBIT or HARE  
 

2.) Call your state Wildlife Manager to report suspected case
 

Arizona--Contact your regional wildlife manager via the AZGFD dispatch radio room: 623-236-7201.
 

Arkansas--[no known cases as of 5.7.20] Contact you regional wildlife manager via your regional office: https://www.agfc.com/en/about-agfc/regional-offices/

California-- [no known cases as of 5.7.20] Contact you regional wildlife manager via your regional office: https://wildlife.ca.gov/Regions
 

Colorado--Contact your regional Wildlife manager via your regional office: https://cpw.state.co.us/aboutus/Pages/OfficeLocationMap.aspx
 

Louisiana--[no known cases as of 5.7.20] Contact your regional WM via your regional office:
https://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/page/contact-us. At the bottom of the page select 'Wildlife', then scroll right to see the phone numbers.


New Mexico--Contact your local Wildlife manager via your regional office: http://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/home/contact/location-map/


Nevada-- Contact your local wildlife manager via your regional office: http://www.ndow.org/Our_Agency/Contact_Us/


Oklahoma--[no known cases as of 5.7.20] report it to the state vets office, 405-522-6141. www.oda.state.ok.us/ais/reportdisease.pdf.


Texas-- Contact you local wildlife manager via your regional management area: https://tpwd.texas.gov/…/land/technical_guidance/biologists/

 

Utah-- [no known cases as of 5.7.20] Contact your local wildlife manager via your regional office: https://wildlife.utah.gov/about-us/contact-dwr.html

2) Contact the National Wildlife Health Center
608-270-2480
email at NWHC-epi@usgs.gov,

A field 
epidemiologist will be available to discuss the case. 


Report death & request Disease Investigation Services 

Further information about our services can be found at www.usgs.gov/nwhc/services. To learn more about submitting samples and reporting events, go to www.usgs.gov/nwhc/submit.